2 ex-LMPD officers accused of throwing drinks at people plead guilty

Two former Louisville Metro Police Department officers who have been accused of throwing drinks at people have pleaded guilty in federal court. conspiracy to violate civil rights.Flynn is shown in the photo above. The LMPD said they no longer have a photo of Wilson. Officials said that between August 2018 and September 2019, they violated “the civil rights of numerous civilians in Louisville through oppression and intimidation” while employed with LMPD.The two, dressed in their uniforms, but in unmarked cars, would pull up and drive slow near someone on a sidewalk and then throw a drink, including the container, at them.Officials said they would also shout things through the police radio like “someone was thirsty” and “thirsty fam” and then take off.The DOJ said on many occasions, the civilian was hit with the beverage, and on at least one occasion, a person was knocked down to the ground from the impact of being hit with the beverage and container. Wilson and Flynn would record or instruct others to record their actions on video using their cell phones, sometimes from inside the car from which the beverage was thrown and sometimes from an LMPD car following closely behind the car from which the beverage was thrown. The DOJ said Wilson showed those videos to other members of the LMPD Ninth Mobile Unit.Wilson and Flynn are both scheduled to be sentenced on Sept. 30 and face a decade or more in prison.Wilson also pleaded guilty in a separate case on Tuesday to one count of conspiracy to commit cyberstalking. The DOJ said in 2020, he identified computer applications belonging to women, hacked applications and stole compromising photographs, videos and other information. He then contacted the women via text messages and threatened to publish the stolen compromising photographs and videos unless those women provided additional compromising material to him. Throughout the course of cyberstalking conspiracy, Wilson had at least six female victims from whom he stole compromising photographs, videos and other information and attempted to extort additional material on the threat of publication. Chief Erika Shields released a statement later on Tuesday saying she was made aware in May 2021 that the FBI was investigating Flynn and Wilson. She said that she immediately removed Flynn from the street and suspended his police powers in order to restrict his interactions with the public while he was under investigation. Shields said that Flynn resigned from the LMPD effective immediately on Tuesday after the plea was announced. am initiating an internal investigation with the Professional Standards Unit that will determine what level of knowledge or involvement anyone else may have had about these incidents and if so, they will be disciplined appropriately, up to and including termination, “said Shields.Shields acknowledged how this kind of situation can damage public perception of law enforcement and that she would work hard to make sure the LMPD is better represented to the community. “I want to make it clear to everyone, the actions of former Detectives Flynn and Wilson are reprehensible, sickening , and do not reflect the core values ​​of LMPD, “Shields said. “Their behavior was demoralizing and dehumanizing to the victims. On behalf of this agency, I wish to express my sincere apologies to those affected. This type of behavior will not be tolerated. We owe our community better and this is not a representative of the good work the men and women of LMPD strive for every day. ”

Two former Louisville Metro Police Department officers who have been accused of throwing drinks at people have pleaded guilty in federal court.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, Bryan Andrew Wilson, 36, and Curt Flynn, 40, both pled guilty Tuesday to one count of conspiracy to violate civil rights.

Flynn is shown in the photo above. The LMPD said they no longer have a photo of Wilson.

Officials said that between August 2018 and September 2019, they violated “the civil rights of numerous civilians in Louisville through oppression and intimidation” while employed with LMPD.

The two, dressed in their uniforms, but in unmarked cars, would pull up and drive slow near someone on a sidewalk and then throw a drink, including the container, at them.

Officials said they would also shout things through the police radio like “someone was thirsty” and “thirsty fam” and then take off.

The DOJ said on many occasions, the civilian was hit with the beverage, and on at least one occasion, a person was knocked down to the ground from the impact of being hit with the beverage and container.

Wilson and Flynn would record or instruct others to record their actions on video using their cell phones, sometimes from inside the car from which the beverage was thrown and sometimes from an LMPD car following closely behind the car from which the beverage was thrown.

The DOJ said Wilson showed those videos to other members of the LMPD Ninth Mobile Unit.

Wilson and Flynn are both scheduled to be sentenced on Sept. 30 and face a decade or more in prison.

Wilson also pleaded guilty in a separate case on Tuesday to one count of conspiracy to commit cyberstalking. The DOJ said in 2020, he identified computer applications belonging to women, hacked applications and stole compromising photographs, videos and other information.

He then contacted the women via text messages and threatened to publish the stolen compromising photographs and videos unless those women provided additional compromising material to him.

Throughout the course of cyberstalking conspiracy, Wilson had at least six female victims from whom he stole compromising photographs, videos and other information and attempted to extort additional material on the threat of publication.

Chief Erika Shields released a statement later on Tuesday saying she was made aware in May 2021 that the FBI was investigating Flynn and Wilson.

She said she immediately removed Flynn from the street and suspended his police powers in order to restrict his interactions with the public while he was under investigation.

Shields said Flynn resigned from the LMPD effective immediately on Tuesday after the plea was announced.

“I am initiating an internal investigation with the Professional Standards Unit that will determine what level of knowledge or involvement anyone else may have had about these incidents and if so, they will be disciplined appropriately, up to and including termination,” Shields said.

Shields acknowledged how this kind of situation can damage public perception of law enforcement and that it would work hard to make sure the LMPD is better represented to the community.

“I want to make it clear to everyone, the actions of former Detectives Flynn and Wilson are reprehensible, sickening, and do not reflect the core values ​​of LMPD,” Shields said. “Their behavior was demoralizing and dehumanizing to the victims. On behalf of this agency, I wish to express my sincere apologies to those affected. This type of behavior will not be tolerated. We owe our community better and this is not a representative of the good work the men and women of LMPD strive for every day. “

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